Impact of fame on sports performance

Impact of fame on sports performance
Impact of fame on sports performance

Introduction

Impact of fame on sports performance. The link between an athlete’s mental state and his or her performance has been studied extensively in many books, articles, and studies that have been published over the years. A point of agreement explicitly mentioned in these sources is that distractions have a negative impact on athletic performance efficiency. It is claimed that distractions impair an athlete’s capacity to concentrate on his or her training. Difficulties with concentration cause negative emotional reactions, high levels of arousal and anxiety, as well as tension, which results in the waste of mental energy. Concentration and the ability to keep a pleasant mental attitude are both dependent on one’s ability to generate and preserve mental energy. Effortlessly focusing allows an athlete to preserve physical energy by retaining excellent technique and attention, doing tasks correctly, and pushing the body beyond pain and exhaustion barriers. Time spent worrying about distractions depletes mental energy, resulting in diminished performance (Manktelow, 2006). In accordance with Haverstraw (2002), distractions can arise from a variety of sources, including the presence of loved ones whom you wish to impress, family or relationship problems, teammates and other competitors, coaches, underperformance or unexpected high performance, frustration at mistakes, poor refereeing decisions, changes in familiar patterns, unjust criticism, and the media, among others.

The goal of this article is to begin an investigation of the media’s ability to serve as a distraction and its effect on athletes’ ability to perform. For the purposes of this study, it is critical to have a consistent definition and understanding of the terms media, arousal, stress, anxiety, and mood, among others. Individuals who openly report or make public remarks on an athlete’s performance will be considered to be members of the media under this definition. The term “media” in this sense refers to those who write about sports for newspapers or for paparazzi or television newscasters, as well as fans and critics who post their criticisms of athletic performance on public forums or blogs.

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A number of precise terminologies will be utilized throughout this article in order to distinguish between arousal, anxiety, and stress. An arousal state will be defined as a state of attentiveness that occurs when the body prepares for action. It is connected with increases in physiological and psychological activity, such as increased heart rate and increased attention span (although not always) (Landers, 1980). Stress is described as a mental condition that occurs as a consequence of the expectations imposed on an individual, which necessitates the individual engaging in some kind of coping activity (Jones, 1990). A person’s anxiety is caused when he or she has questions about his or her capacity to deal with the scenario that is causing him or her stress (Hardy et al., 1996). Furthermore, for the sake of this work, the mood is defined as a collection of persistent emotions connected with evaluative and cognitive states that impact all future assessments, feelings, and actions (Amado-Boccara et al., 1993). Now that everyone has a shared grasp of these concepts, it’s crucial to understand how they relate to athletic performance in general.

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Many models have been developed in the area of Sport Psychology to investigate the relationship between arousal and anxiety levels and athletic performance levels. Following critiques of a lack of evidence, prominent unidimensional models such as the Inverted U-Theory and the Catastrophe Theory are being phased out in favor of multidimensional-type models such as the Chaos Theory (Weinberg, 1990). For example, the Multidimensional Anxiety Theory developed by Martens et al. (1990) focuses on the anxiety response that occurs when a person is exposed to high amounts of stress.

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Cognitive anxiety and physical anxiety are two separate types of anxiety that are considered. When people experience cognitive anxiety, they experience distractions such as difficulty focusing, interruptions in concentration, and unfavorable performance expectations (Martens et al., 1990). Additionally, the somatic anxiety factor refers to felt physiological arousal, such as a higher heart rate and increased sweat, among other things (Martens et al., 1990). According to The Multidimensional Anxiety Theory in general, as cognitive anxiety grows, athletic performance diminishes. Also concluded is that an inverted-U connection between somatic anxiety and athletic performance may be explained by a causal link between the two. It can be seen from this inverted-U connection that when somatic anxiety grows from low to moderate levels, there is an accompanying increase in performance. However, performance levels begin to deteriorate whenever intensity levels surpass or fall below this moderate range of intensity (Davidson & Schwartz, 1976).