Woman who had face full of tattoos shows what she looks like after undergoing removal

Woman who had face full of tattoos shows what she looks like after undergoing removal

A lady with several facial tattoos underwent more than three years of laser treatment in an effort to totally remove them.
Alyssa Zebrasky, 31, received a “Day of the Dead” tattoo on her face five years ago while still in a “toxic” relationship with her former.

“You should have your face tattooed,” my ex said during a talk, according to Alyssa, who is from Cleveland, Ohio.

I first responded “no,” but he persisted in talking about it. To ensure that no one else would desire me, I now think it was.

He selected the tattoo’s design. My entire face was a Day of the Dead sugar skull.

He had tattoos all over him, including his feet, so I assume he wanted us to match.

In six months, she was taken into custody three times, and each time her peculiar mugshot went viral.

Once, the pair even got into a brief police pursuit, which they justified by saying he “needed the restroom.”
Alyssa has changed her life since terminating the relationship and entering recovery, though.

I simply feel disappointed in myself when I look back at those photos,” she added.

But I must keep in mind that, unlike today, I hadn’t sought to improve myself or learn how to appreciate myself.

“Therefore, I feel proud because change, healing, and discovering new things are all possible.” I enjoy looking back and seeing my personal development.

The heavy machinery worker is employing the Austin, Texas, charity programme “INK-nitiative” to permanently erase the tattoos, which are now covered with thick foundation.

With the help of her family and new boyfriend, with whom she claims to be in “the healthiest relationship,” she is sharing her story on social media.

Alyssa has tattoos all over her body, but she just wants to get rid of the ones on her face so she can forget about her ex.
Everyone was saying very, really hurtful things about me on social media, and I didn’t even get a chance to explain my side of the story, she said.

It was a whirlwind throughout that six-month courtship that abruptly became darker. He may have paid me two visits while I was in jail.

I have to keep it in mind whenever I look in the mirror. Mentally, I began to recover from everything I had to go through with him.

“I participated in a drug court programme, went to treatment, and transformed.” Now, whenever I look in the mirror, it serves as a constant reminder of my ordeal.

She was informed that she would require 12 sessions when she began the removal process in October 2019.

As a tattoo, your body can only heal so much at once, so when I first started visiting, they did my hands, forehead, and cheeks, Alyssa explained. The cheeks are already gone, but we have not yet begun the area surrounding the lips. The cheeks were quite comfortable, but after having my nose done, the pain is quite severe.

 

The sitting session is far quicker than getting a tattoo itself, and each session lasts about 20 minutes.

“The first agony from the laser is like having a rubber band break across your skin; after that, it hurts for about 30 minutes,” the patient said.

The closest I can come to describing how it feels on my hands is to say that it welts up after and causes some discomfort akin to if you spilled stove oil on your fingers.

“It doesn’t burn as much on my face, but there is edema.”

She said that she had now “accepted” herself and wished for others to benefit from her experiences.

I used to cover them up when I went to see my family, Alyssa recalled.

“I don’t have to hide them anymore, my mother informed me, which was good,”

“[My family] has been supportive throughout the entire situation; they are aware of how vulnerable I was.

I don’t really pay attention to the criticism I receive on TikTok and social media, despite how much of it I do receive.

‘I might be assisting someone in a comparable circumstance, it may be drug addiction or they underwent something extremely traumatic and they want to see somebody else who got through it,’ I could be saying.